Kerry Holden

Kerry Holden

Kerry’s research interests are in exploring knowledge cultures and practices transnationally. She focuses on examining the managerial, administrative and professional dimensions of science and technology, analysing the significance of political and moral economies that support how science travels and becomes politically viable. Kerry is lecturer and research fellow in the School of Geography at Queen Mary, University of London (QMUL). Prior to joining QMUL, Kerry completed her PhD at King’s College London and undertook a postdoctoral research fellowship at Concordia University in Montreal examining the emergence of computer science communities in East Africa.

Current position
Lecturer in Human Geography
University affiliation
Queen Mary, University of London

Research

Kerry’s current research project, funded by the UK Economic and Social Research Council, explores the emergence of evidence regimes in political institutions in Africa. She focuses specifically on the Ugandan Parliament, a continual target of donor-sponsored programmes designed to strengthen research capacity; which is often packaged as advancing the skills and resources to translate evidence into policymaking. Having worked as a consultant on a programme managed initially by the UK Parliament, she designed and successfully applied for a research project that examines more carefully how capacity is conceived and worked on in parliamentary contexts; how the political ideals and value systems that underpin interventions in research capacity circulate and find distinction; and how new epistemic orders emerge to influence political decision-making. Cutting across these questions are threads that attend to professionalism, institutional structures, ignorance and informality, and trust and survivalism. This research project draws on anthropology, geography, history and political science in order to understand the making of knowledge systems in an African parliament.

Publications

  • Holden, Kerry, and Nele Jensen (2016) "From under the wheels of the juggernaut: global health networks, gold standards and the possibilities for social science critique." in Science as Culture 26 (1):124-132.
  • Holden, Kerry, and Aaron Van Klyton (2016) "Exploring the tensions and incongruities of Internet governance in Africa." in Government Information Quarterly 33 (4):736-745.
  • Holden, Kerry (2015) "Lamenting the golden age: love, labour and loss in the collective memory of scientists." in Science as Culture 24 (1):24-45.
  • Holden, Kerry, and David Demeritt (2008) "Democratising Science? The politics of promoting biomedicine in Singapore’s developmental state." in Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 26 (1):68-86.